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Angry Birds no espaço

You know a game is big when they advertise during the Superbowl—you know a game is GINORMOUS when they advertise it in space. NASA astronaut Don Petit took

ESA Science & Technology: Home page

ESA Science & Technology: Low light test on micro-shutter arrayOne of the defining, and pioneering, features of the NIRSpec instrument is its ability to record the spectra of many (more than objects at the same time

All right. Well, take care yourself. I guess that’s what you’re best, presence old master? A tremor in the Force. The last time felt it was in the presence of my old master. I have traced the Rebel spies to her. Now she is my only link to finding their secret base. A tremor in the...

All right. Well, take care yourself. I guess that’s what you’re best, presence old master? A tremor in the Force. The last time felt it was in the presence of my old master. I have traced the Rebel spies to her. Now she is my only link to finding their secret base. A tremor in the...

NASA Astronaut Don Pettit, speaks about his experience onboard the International Space Station at a NASA Social exploring science on the ISS at NASA Headquarters, Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2013 in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

NASA Astronaut Don Pettit, speaks about his experience onboard the International Space Station at a NASA Social exploring science on the ISS at NASA Headquarters, Wednesday, Feb.

NASA - Fly Marines exhibit at the National Air and Space Museum 6/27/2012.  Left to right:  Charles Bolden, NASA Administrator; Senator John Glenn; and General John R. Dailey, director of the museum.

Fly Marines

NASA - Fly Marines exhibit at the National Air and Space Museum Left to right: Charles Bolden, NASA Administrator; and General John R. Dailey, director of the museum.

Catherine Jaunezems, an aerodynamics education specialist at NASA Langley Research Center, talks with 10-year-old Kaylie Strickland, a student from in Richmond, Va.. Credit: NASA/Sean Smith

Catherine Jaunezems, an aerodynamics education specialist at NASA Langley Research Center, talks with Kaylie Strickland, a student from in Richmond, Va.

Les câbles électriques sont entourés d'aluminium pour les protéger du froid

L'assemblage du télescope spatial James-Webb, le successeur d'Hubble

James Webb Space Telescope: Engineer Erin Wilson adds aluminum tape to electrical cables to protect them from the cold during environmental testing of special optical equipment.

NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver, in yellow jacket, stands with participants from the NASA Social underneath the engines of the Saturn V rocket at the Apollo Saturn V visitor center, Thursday, May 18, 2012, at Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla.

NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver, in yellow jacket, stands with participants from the NASA Social underneath the engines of the Saturn V rocket at the Apollo Saturn V visitor center, Thursday, May 18, 2012, at Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla.

NASA spacecraft to study Moon's atmosphere

NASA - LADEE Arrives at Wallops for Moon Mission: The The NASA Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) getting ready for its trip to the Moon. Looks like giant Marshmallow right now.

While this may look like a futuristic tunnel to another world, it is really looking up inside a nearly complete fuel tank for NASA’s powerful, new rocket—the Space Launch System—that will take humans to destinations never explored by people before. At over 300-feet tall and 5.75 million pounds at liftoff, SLS needs plenty of fuel to leave Earth. Once a final dome is added to the liquid hydrogen rocket fuel tank, shown here, it will come in at 27.5-feet in diameter and over 130-feet long...

Peek Inside SLS: Fuel Tank For World’s Largest Rocket Nears Completion

While this may look like a futuristic tunnel to another world, it is really looking up inside a nearly complete fuel tank for NASA’s powerful, new rocket—the Space Launch System—that will take humans to destinations never explored by people before. At over 300-feet tall and 5.75 million pounds at liftoff, SLS needs plenty of fuel to leave Earth. Once a final dome is added to the liquid hydrogen rocket fuel tank, shown here, it will come in at 27.5-feet in diameter and over 130-feet long...

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