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Hirola

The hirola - perhaps the world's rarest and most endangered antelope.

The hirola, a large African antelope known for its striking, goggle-like eye markings, is the only remaining species in the genus Beatragus

The hirola, a large African antelope known for its striking, goggle-like eye markings, is the only remaining species in the genus Beatragus

Humhead Wrasse

Humhead Wrasse: These fish are very important to coral reef health. They eat crown-of-thorn starfish and therefore keep populations of this damaging coral reef predator in check.

Saving Sulawesi's Endangered Large Mammals and their Critical Habitat, the Nantu Forest - © Lynn Clayton

Saving Sulawesi's Endangered Large Mammals and their Critical Habitat, the Nantu Forest - © Lynn Clayton

Hirola (Beatragus hunteri)

Hirola (Beatragus hunteri)

Silver Rice Rat | silver rice rat oryzomys argentatus endangered silver rice rat occupy

Silver Rice Rat | silver rice rat oryzomys argentatus endangered silver rice rat occupy

Cambodian Forest Ox | Kouprey, Cambodian Wild Ox, Indo-Chinese Forest Ox, Grey Ox  Not discovered until 1937.  Found in Northern Cambodia, Thailand, Southern Laos, and Western Vietnam.  In the 1970s it was thought they were extinct.  They are a very elusive species.  Critically Endangered.

Cambodian Forest Ox | Kouprey, Cambodian Wild Ox, Indo-Chinese Forest Ox, Grey Ox Not discovered until 1937. Found in Northern Cambodia, Thailand, Southern Laos, and Western Vietnam. In the 1970s it was thought they were extinct. They are a very elusive species. Critically Endangered.

Community conservation of an endangered Kenyan antelope

Searching for Africa’s Most Endangered Antelope

Greater big-footed mouse foraging in canopy

The greater big-footed mouse belongs to the subfamily Nesomyinae, a group of 20 rodent species found only in Madagascar. This small, gerbil-like mouse has relatively large eyes which hint at its nocturnal behaviour.

Hirola | Hirola (Beatragus hunteri), once widespread in Africa, they are now only found along the border of Kenya and Somalia. Within the last 30 years, their population went from 14,000 to around 600. Decline has been caused by habitat loss and drought. Critically endangered.

Hirola - View amazing Hirola photos - Beatragus hunteri - on Arkive

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