Marble portrait head from a statue of a woman wearing a diadem, possibly Herennia Etruscilla.Briish Museum

Full: Front Marble portrait head from a statue of a woman wearing a diadem, possibly Herennia Etruscilla. © The Trustees of the British Museum

Portrait of young Faustina Minor  Sculpture  147-148 AD  Marble  cm 60  Annia Galeria Faustina Minor (Minor Latin for the Younger), Faustina Minor or Faustina the Younger (16 February between 125 and 130 – 175) was a daughter of Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius and Roman Empress Faustina the Elder. She was a Roman Empress and wife to her maternal cousin Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius.  Capitoline museum

Portrait of young Faustina Minor / Hall of the Emperors / Palazzo Nuovo / Through the rooms - Musei Capitolini

AN ETRUSCAN TERRACOTTA PORTRAIT HEAD OF A WOMAN, CIRCA 3RD/2ND CENTURY B.C. her finely modeled face with dimpled chin, outlined slightly parted lips, straight nose, and pierced ears, her hair parted in the center and brushed back from the temples, and bound in a fillet wound twice around the head.  Height 8 1/2 in. 21.6 cm.

An Etruscan Terracotta Portrait Head of a Woman, Circa 150 B.

Plotina, wife of Trajan - they became Hadrian's guardians when he was a boy. Pompeia Plotina Claudia Phoebe Piso or Potius piolet (d. 121/122) was a Roman Empress and wife of Roman Emperor Trajan. She was renowned for her interest in philosophy, and her virtue, dignity and simplicity. She was particularly devoted to the Epicurean philosophical school in Athens

Plotina, wife of Trajan - they became Hadrian's guardians when he was a boy. Pompeia Plotina Claudia Phoebe Piso or Potius piolet (d. 121/122) was a Roman Empress and wife of Roman Emperor Trajan. She was renowned for her interest in philosophy, and her virtue, dignity and simplicity. She was particularly devoted to the Epicurean philosophical school in Athens

Portrait bust of a woman, marble, Roman Imperial, reign of Trajan, circa 100-110 A.D.

Portrait bust of a woman, marble, Roman Imperial, reign of Trajan, circa

Ancient Rome: Roman woman wearing a "diadem" wig that was fashionable at the time. At that time, popular hairstyles changed so quickly that women often had their statues made with removable hairpieces so that the hairstyle could easily be switched out.

lionofchaeronea: “ Bust of a Roman woman, sporting the raised hairstyle popular during the Flavian dynasty CE). Now in the Glyptothek, Munich.

Detail of a child's tomb monument showing an ancient Roman boy wearing a bulla, the amulet thought to protect a freeborn boy from malevolent supernatural influences and marked him as sexually unavailable

Detail of a child's tomb monument showing an ancient Roman boy wearing a bulla, the amulet thought to protect a freeborn boy from malevolent supernatural influences and marked him as sexually unavailable

Pinterest
Search