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John Charles Ryle (10 May 1816 – 10 June 1900) was the first Anglican bishop of Liverpool. “From his conversion [in 1837] to his burial [in 1900], J.C. Ryle was entirely one-dimensional. He was a one-book man; he was steeped in Scripture; he bled the Bible.“This is WHY his works have lasted—and will last—they bear the stamp of eternity.Today, more than a hundred years after his passing, Ryle’s works stand at the crossroads between the historic faith and modern evangelicalism."

John Charles Ryle (10 May 1816 – 10 June 1900) was the first Anglican bishop of Liverpool. “From his conversion [in 1837] to his burial [in 1900], J.C. Ryle was entirely one-dimensional. He was a one-book man; he was steeped in Scripture; he bled the Bible.“This is WHY his works have lasted—and will last—they bear the stamp of eternity.Today, more than a hundred years after his passing, Ryle’s works stand at the crossroads between the historic faith and modern evangelicalism."

John Charles Ryle (10 May 1816 – 10 June 1900) was the first Anglican bishop of Liverpool. “From his conversion [in 1837] to his burial [in 1900], J.C. Ryle was entirely one-dimensional. He was a one-book man; he was steeped in Scripture; he bled the Bible. “This is WHY his works have lasted—and will last—they bear the stamp of eternity. Today, more than a hundred years after his passing, Ryle’s works stand at the crossroads between the historic faith and modern evangelicalism."

John Charles Ryle (10 May 1816 – 10 June 1900) was the first Anglican bishop of Liverpool. “From his conversion [in 1837] to his burial [in 1900], J.C. Ryle was entirely one-dimensional. He was a one-book man; he was steeped in Scripture; he bled the Bible. “This is WHY his works have lasted—and will last—they bear the stamp of eternity. Today, more than a hundred years after his passing, Ryle’s works stand at the crossroads between the historic faith and modern evangelicalism."

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Why God? I know I have asked God why many times. But why do I feel God owes me an explanation? I'm learning to surrender my false entitlement to know why.

Trusting God

Why God? I know I have asked God why many times. But why do I feel God owes me an explanation? I'm learning to surrender my false entitlement to know why.

John Charles Ryle (10 May 1816 – 10 June 1900) was the first Anglican bishop of Liverpool. “From his conversion [in 1837] to his burial [in 1900], J.C. Ryle was entirely one-dimensional. He was a one-book man; he was steeped in Scripture; he bled the Bible.“This is WHY his works have lasted—and will last—they bear the stamp of eternity.Today, more than a hundred years after his passing, Ryle’s works stand at the crossroads between the historic faith and modern evangelicalism."

John Charles Ryle (10 May 1816 – 10 June 1900) was the first Anglican bishop of Liverpool. “From his conversion [in 1837] to his burial [in 1900], J.C. Ryle was entirely one-dimensional. He was a one-book man; he was steeped in Scripture; he bled the Bible.“This is WHY his works have lasted—and will last—they bear the stamp of eternity.Today, more than a hundred years after his passing, Ryle’s works stand at the crossroads between the historic faith and modern evangelicalism."

John Charles Ryle (10 May 1816 – 10 June 1900) was the first Anglican bishop of Liverpool. “From his conversion [in 1837] to his burial [in 1900], J.C. Ryle was entirely one-dimensional. He was a one-book man; he was steeped in Scripture; he bled the Bible. “This is WHY his works have lasted—and will last—they bear the stamp of eternity. Today, more than a hundred years after his passing, Ryle’s works stand at the crossroads between the historic faith and modern evangelicalism."

John Charles Ryle (10 May 1816 – 10 June 1900) was the first Anglican bishop of Liverpool. “From his conversion [in 1837] to his burial [in 1900], J.C. Ryle was entirely one-dimensional. He was a one-book man; he was steeped in Scripture; he bled the Bible. “This is WHY his works have lasted—and will last—they bear the stamp of eternity. Today, more than a hundred years after his passing, Ryle’s works stand at the crossroads between the historic faith and modern evangelicalism."

John Charles Ryle (10 May 1816 – 10 June 1900) was the first Anglican bishop of Liverpool. “From his conversion [in 1837] to his burial [in 1900], J.C. Ryle was entirely one-dimensional. He was a one-book man; he was steeped in Scripture; he bled the Bible. “This is WHY his works have lasted—and will last—they bear the stamp of eternity. Today, more than a hundred years after his passing, Ryle’s works stand at the crossroads between the historic faith and modern evangelicalism."

John Charles Ryle (10 May 1816 – 10 June 1900) was the first Anglican bishop of Liverpool. “From his conversion [in 1837] to his burial [in 1900], J.C. Ryle was entirely one-dimensional. He was a one-book man; he was steeped in Scripture; he bled the Bible. “This is WHY his works have lasted—and will last—they bear the stamp of eternity. Today, more than a hundred years after his passing, Ryle’s works stand at the crossroads between the historic faith and modern evangelicalism."

John Charles Ryle (10 May 1816 – 10 June 1900) was the first Anglican bishop of Liverpool. “From his conversion [in 1837] to his burial [in 1900], J.C. Ryle was entirely one-dimensional. He was a one-book man; he was steeped in Scripture; he bled the Bible. “This is WHY his works have lasted—and will last—they bear the stamp of eternity. Today, more than a hundred years after his passing, Ryle’s works stand at the crossroads between the historic faith and modern evangelicalism."

John Charles Ryle (10 May 1816 – 10 June 1900) was the first Anglican bishop of Liverpool. “From his conversion [in 1837] to his burial [in 1900], J.C. Ryle was entirely one-dimensional. He was a one-book man; he was steeped in Scripture; he bled the Bible. “This is WHY his works have lasted—and will last—they bear the stamp of eternity. Today, more than a hundred years after his passing, Ryle’s works stand at the crossroads between the historic faith and modern evangelicalism."

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