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hitotsume-bōzu – o monge ciclópe (cyclop monk) - in “Ehon Kaibutsu” , Nabeta Gyokuei, 1881

hitotsume-bōzu – o monge ciclópe (cyclop monk) - in “Ehon Kaibutsu” , Nabeta Gyokuei, 1881

http://www.retronaut.co/2012/03/monsters-from-the-kaibutsu-ehon-1881/ Tanuki-bō - A monk who turned into a tanuki

http://www.retronaut.co/2012/03/monsters-from-the-kaibutsu-ehon-1881/ Tanuki-bō - A monk who turned into a tanuki

Bob Dylan expõe pinturas inspiradas em viagens ao Brasil

Bob Dylan expõe pinturas inspiradas em viagens ao Brasil

Bob Dylan e outros heróis da galeria do rock'n'roll têm sempre lugar marcado em todos os noticiários. Agora Mister Tambourine...

Noderabō -- Strange creature standing near a temple bell

Noderabō -- Strange creature standing near a temple bell

Pintura Bob Dylan  (Foto: Divulgação)

Bob Dylan expõe pinturas inspiradas em viagens ao Brasil

Pintura Bob Dylan (Foto: Divulgação)

8 Hilariously non-threatening monsters from Japanese Folklore

8 Hilariously non-threatening monsters from Japanese Folklore

art with candles

Arte feita com fuligem de vela de Steven Spazuk

art with candles

Toriyama Sekien, Lizard Warrior

Toriyama Sekien, Lizard Warrior

Te-no-me (手の目, てのめ)  Te-no-me first appears in Toriyama Sekien’s Gazu Hyakki Yagyo. Unfortunately, this is another yokai for which Sekien didn’t even write a single sentence about — just an illustration — and so his original intent is lost to the mists of time. However, other older stories exist which describe monsters fitting te-no-me’s description, and perhaps it was these stories which Sekien based his yokai on.  Te-no-me takes the appearance of a zato, a blind man. Back in the Edo…

Te-no-me (手の目, てのめ) Te-no-me first appears in Toriyama Sekien’s Gazu Hyakki Yagyo. Unfortunately, this is another yokai for which Sekien didn’t even write a single sentence about — just an illustration — and so his original intent is lost to the mists of time. However, other older stories exist which describe monsters fitting te-no-me’s description, and perhaps it was these stories which Sekien based his yokai on. Te-no-me takes the appearance of a zato, a blind man. Back in the Edo…

http://www.retronaut.co/2012/03/monsters-from-the-kaibutsu-ehon-1881/ Ubume - Ghost of woman who died during childbirth

http://www.retronaut.co/2012/03/monsters-from-the-kaibutsu-ehon-1881/ Ubume - Ghost of woman who died during childbirth

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