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Portuguese Sayings ツ
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Illustrations of Portuguese sayings that make absolutely no sense, but everybody knows and uses them.
"Under the Banana Tree shade" meaning: No Worries

Portuguese sayings that make absolutely no sense.

"Bread bread, cheese cheese" meaning: It is This Simple!

Portuguese sayings that make absolutely no sense.

"Rotten face" meaning: Shameless/For Everyone To See

Portuguese sayings that make absolutely no sense.

"A lot of cans" meaning: 100% Shameless

16 Portuguese Sayings That Don’t Make Any Sense Having a lot of cans = shameless (Portuguese from Portugal; Brazilian Portuguese = ter a cara de pau [having a wood face])

"Water up his beard" meaning: A Lot Of Work

Portuguese sayings that make absolutely no sense.

"Go bother Camões" meaning: Go Bother Someone Else/Leave Me Alone

Portuguese sayings that make absolutely no sense.

"Good as corn" meaning: Being As Hot As He/She Gets

Portuguese sayings that make absolutely no sense.

"Breaking all the dishes" meaning: Rockin'!!

16 Portuguese Sayings That Don’t Make Any Sense Breaking all the dishes = rockin'! (Portuguese from Portugal)

"Take the little horse from the rain" meaning: Don’t Count On That!

Portuguese sayings that make absolutely no sense.

"Swallow frogs" meaning: Shut Up And Accept Unpleasant Things

16 Portuguese Sayings That Don’t Make Any Sense Swallow frogs = shut up and accept unpleasant things

"Comb monkeys" meaning: Go **** Yourself (in a polite way...)

"Comb monkeys" meaning: Go **** Yourself (in a polite way.

"Little monkeys in the head" meaning: Having Strange/Suspicious Thoughts

16 Portuguese Sayings That Don’t Make Any Sense Little monkeys in the head = having strange/suspicious thoughts (Portuguese from Portugal)

"Many years turning chickens" meaning: A Lot Of Experience/Knowledge

Portuguese sayings that make absolutely no sense.

"Wake up with the feet outside" meaning: Woke Up In A Bad Mood

16 Portuguese Sayings That Don’t Make Any Sense Wake up with the feet outside = wake up in a bad mood (Portuguese from Portugal; Brazilian Portuguese = levantar com o pé esquerdo [get up with the left foot])