Iron age

Castell Henllys. "The Iron Age Celts' clothes might have looked like the tartan you see in Scotland and Ireland today, with checks and stripes. The Celts used berries and plants to dye the wool different colours."-BBC

Castell Henllys. "The Iron Age Celts' clothes might have looked like the tartan you see in Scotland and Ireland today, with checks and stripes. The Celts used berries and plants to dye the wool different colours."-BBC

Celtic Clothing During the Iron Age- A Very Broad and Generic Approach | heather smith - Academia.edu

Celtic Clothing During the Iron Age- A Very Broad and Generic Approach | heather smith - Academia.edu

The main frame of the roundhouse would have been made of upright timbers, which were interwoven with coppiced wood - usually hazel, oak, ash or pollarded willow - to make wattle walls. This was then covered with a daub made from clay, soil, straw and animal manure that would weatherproof the house. The roof was constructed from large timbers and densely thatched.        All of the domestic life would have occurred within the roundhouse.

The main frame of the roundhouse would have been made of upright timbers, which were interwoven with coppiced wood - usually hazel, oak, ash or pollarded willow - to make wattle walls. This was then covered with a daub made from clay, soil, straw and animal manure that would weatherproof the house. The roof was constructed from large timbers and densely thatched. All of the domestic life would have occurred within the roundhouse.

Reproduction of Latgallian/Latgaļu Iron Age from Latvia. Baltic, not Norse/Viking or Slavic.

Reproduction of Latgallian/Latgaļu Iron Age from Latvia. Baltic, not Norse/Viking or Slavic.

Iron Age house at Westhay    Reconstruction of an Iron Age house at the Peat Moors Centre, Westhay. The house is based on one found at the nearby Glastonbury Lake Village.

Iron Age house at Westhay Reconstruction of an Iron Age house at the Peat Moors Centre, Westhay. The house is based on one found at the nearby Glastonbury Lake Village.

British Museum The Battersea shield. Iron Age, c. 350–50 BC. Found in the River Thames, London, England. A votive offering to the gods! The gods that loved underground! HOWEVER! It was found with a handle! what does this mean? it could mean it was used in ceremonial procession... Was it supposed to dropped in the river? With such exquisite metal work (e.g. repousse and enamelling) was it probably that it was owned by a wealthy patron?

British Museum The Battersea shield. Iron Age, c. 350–50 BC. Found in the River Thames, London, England. A votive offering to the gods! The gods that loved underground! HOWEVER! It was found with a handle! what does this mean? it could mean it was used in ceremonial procession... Was it supposed to dropped in the river? With such exquisite metal work (e.g. repousse and enamelling) was it probably that it was owned by a wealthy patron?

Iron age Celtic Gold earing discovered on the Algarve (South Portugal). On display at the National Museum of Archaeology, Lisbon, Portugal.   Image: http://www.matriznet.dgpc.pt/MatrizNet/Objectos/ObjectosConsultar.aspx?IdReg=124532

Iron age Celtic Gold earing discovered on the Algarve (South Portugal). On display at the National Museum of Archaeology, Lisbon, Portugal. Image: http://www.matriznet.dgpc.pt/MatrizNet/Objectos/ObjectosConsultar.aspx?IdReg=124532

Recreation of British Celtic Round House. There is evidence of a saddle quern-stone, which would have been used to grind corn* to make bread. There may have been an oven somewhere in the roundhouse (pictured - right)*.

Recreation of British Celtic Round House. There is evidence of a saddle quern-stone, which would have been used to grind corn* to make bread. There may have been an oven somewhere in the roundhouse (pictured - right)*.

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